HSF briefs

Helen Suzman Foundation | Apr 08, 2015
Water Scarcity In South Africa: A Result Of Physical Or Economic Factors?
Jan 15, 2020
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Nhlanhla Mnisi

South Africa is often described as a water-scarce country. This is based principally on physical descriptors like climatic conditions and escalating water demands. This brief investigates whether observed water scarcity in South Africa can be attributed to physical or economic factors, or both.

Water infrastructure backlog and access to water infrastructure delivered
Dec 02, 2019
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Nhlanhla Mnisi

Since 1994, South Africa has achieved major reductions in water infrastructure backlog with consequent improvement in access to water infrastructure delivery. However, gross rural-urban inequalities still persist. This brief provides an assessment of the state of the national water infrastructure backlog and access to water infrastructure as viewed within global development principles and aspirations.

Emerging Contaminants - Crisis Or Manageable Risk?
Dec 02, 2019
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Nhlanhla Mnisi

At present the global scientific community is grappling with the question of whether emerging contaminants in water pose any substantial health risks to humans. While the serious empirical exploration is under way, misplaced media hype about them risks creating undue public panic. This brief explores current debates, risks and solutions for emerging contaminants in water bodies.

Moral Laws IV: Abortion
Nov 28, 2019
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Lee-Anne Germanos

Abortion, not unlike sex work, is an age old subject which has been criminalised and decriminalised over the centuries. Like both sex work and drugs, abortion is a moral issue which debate has, in recent years (relatively speaking), taken a legal undertone by introducing the question of when life actually begins, with implications for the view that termination of pregnancy is equivalent to murder.

Moral Laws III: Drugs
Nov 28, 2019
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Lee-Anne Germanos

Like the first two briefs on sex work in this ‘Moral Laws’ series, the stigmatisation of drug dependent users as outcasts and criminals is based on a particular morality. Unfortunately, once again, this has played the key role in our government’s (and the world’s) handling, at least until recently, of the drug problem – viewing it as a criminal justice issue as opposed to a health problem.